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Awarded Team System MVP

A little more than a month ago, I was awarded the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) Award for Team System. I haven't said much about it because I try to remain a humble guy and frankly, I've been swamped with work/life. And, unlike a lot of awards, it's not really one you "go after"...it comes to you without a formula.

What I really want to say about this is thank you. Thank you to the community for creating opportunities to present. Thank you to Microsoft for supporting technology professionals and creating jobs and careers around your products (and staying out of the way when I comes to implementation :). Thank you to the community leaders and professionals who dedicate their time and seemingly endless energy to making all of us stronger by creating environments of intense learning and camaraderie. Thank you to my employer for believing in my endeavors and investing in me the time to develop my TFS/VSTS skill set and share what I learn with the community and clients. And finally, I want to thank you--the readers/community/professional folks. Thanks for showing up to presentations, seminars, user groups and conferences. It’s a blast!

I'm humbled even to be mentioned in the same sentence as some of the past and current MVPs. While the MVP is quite an honor, it's not a means to an end. I'm still the same guy. I plan to keep doing the same sort of things I was doing before. To that end, please let me know how I can help you with learning or adopting TFS/VSTS in your environment. If you know me, I'm not completely bias toward TFS...there are other great tools for the job out there. We'll help get you up and running and producing high quality software--regardless of toolset.

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Comments

insurance man said…
"Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) Award for Team System" Congratulations, this is a big deal. ken
Go Big Ten
Roland said…
Don't be fooled by the rocks that I got, I'm still Jeff from the block.

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