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Upgrading TFS Beta 2 to RTM

I have a client migrating to TFS 2008 who was leveraging an old version: 2008 Beta 2. We had difficulty getting the RTM software bits so I ended up extending the license for 30-days. (previous post) Well, it expired yesterday. Arg.

We finally got the RTM bits and I'm upgrading now. My steps:
  1. Follow the uninstall steps to the letter. Get rid of all that old stuff!
  2. Backup your existing TFS databases.
  3. Kick off the TFS 2008 installation and follow instructions
  4. Restart
  5. Install everything else you need: Build, Proxy, Explorer, etc. Oddly, the installation utility must be re-executed and these services installed individually.
  6. Execute the TFS Best Practices Analyzer (BPA) found within the TFS 2008 Power Tools.
    (Good how to here on BPA from Richard Hundhausen.)
  7. Resolve issues discovered with the BPA tool.
My experience (pretty darn good):



The databases were updated automatically.



I received a "Processor type and speed do not meet recommendations." warning but pushed on...this is a proof-of-concept box.



Excuse you? I can't run the services under the account I'm installing under? Great...starting over.

Had some red flags with the Best Practices Analyzer but they were easily fixed. BPA is a great tool (check out this tool for other products as well: Sharepoint, SQL Server).

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