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What is Visual Studio Team System?

Microsoft's marketing engine IMO, missed the mark branding and naming Team System. (To their defense, it's tough to understand this product line and communicate its vast functionality.) I've seen these products referred to as Team System, Team Suite, Team Edition, and a host of other monikers. To help clear up the confusion, here's a brief write-up and a link to Wikipedia which [I hope] offers a clear explanation.

Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition - The Integrated Development Environment (IDE) technology workers use to accomplish work. There are five "editions", each targeted to a particular role:
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Software Developers
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Software Testers
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Database Professionals
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Software Architects
  • Visual Studio 2005 Team Suite - This edition encompasses the functionality of the other four. It's an extra $1200 but I recommend it. The crossover value is well worth the money.
Team Foundation Server - This server-based product enables the collaboration amongst members of the software project team (presumably using Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition). Known as simply TFS (sometimes prefixed with Visual Studio), it provides functionality such as version control, automated building of source, task (or Work Item) tracking, collaboration and project management through Sharepoint, reporting, and data analysis.

Visual Studio 2005 Team Test Load Agent - This add-on module leveraged by Visual Studio simulates virtual users against a web site. It is used in conjunction with the Web Test functionality within Visual Studio 2005 Team Edition for Software Testers.

Visual Studio Team System - This moniker refers to the entire line of products...including all of the above: Visual Studio Team Edition, TFS, and the Load Agent. It is not a product per se but a line. I.e. one cannot purchase Team System, one purchases the individual components of Team System.

Wikipedia Team System Entry

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